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Season 18 – The Heroin Triangle

Official Synopsis: In a collection of affluent suburban communities north of Atlanta called “The Heroin Triangle” the rise of the nation’s opioid crisis, from prescription pills to full-blown heroin epidemic, is documented through city officials, community leaders, and addicts themselves. Tiffany and Billy, a volatile couple living out of their car, receive a sizable tax return that sets them up to score a large of amount of heroin. Their addiction threatens to destroy the family they’re building. As a homeless and gay man, Tracey faces unique challenges as he spends his days hopping busses and hiding out in bathrooms stalls shooting heroin. Zac’s a free-spirit but his musical gifts are undermined by his crippling heroin addiction. Interventionist Heather Hayes enlists the help of her colleague Donna Chavous to further investigate the city’s handling of the epidemic.

Note: Because this season isn’t structured the same at all – episodes follow several different people, there’s no real back story on the addicts, and there won’t necessarily be an intervention each episode – I’m just posting this and y’all can comment on the episodes (there are only 6 episodes anyway) or the season as a whole here.  I’m interested to know what you guys think of what they’re doing this season. It’s an interesting departure for sure.

Categories: Heroin, Season 18

Discussion

94 Responses to “Season 18 – The Heroin Triangle”

  1. I was really looking forward to watching this but had to stop watching after the first minute, watching someone OD was too much of a trigger for me.

    Posted by Anna | January 3, 2018, 5:19 pm
  2. Judging from last night’s episode, this latest variation of “Intervention” is much grittier than the original, and its portrayal of addiction is more realistic and less staged (for lack of a better word). The team of interventionists hitting the streets and working in cooperation with politicians and law enforcement gives a much more real and honest (in my opinion) portrayal of addiction and how it impacts society in general.

    My only criticism is that the show spent too much time jumping from addict to addict and it made it a bit difficult for me to follow the story lines. Aside from that, however, I like the new format.

    Posted by Janelle | January 4, 2018, 10:15 am
  3. Halfway through ep. 3 and I’ve got to admit I’m not feeling this series. It is too scattered (for lack of a better term) and I prefer the old Intervention format.

    Posted by William | January 9, 2018, 6:35 pm
  4. I’m actually enjoying this new format and it’s interesting to see the emerging connections between the people being featured. Also this format allows us to see and appreciate how law enforcement and others can have a positive effect.

    And the way their backstories are emerging iworks for me. The interview with Toni’s sister and dad was an eye opener – surely her mother had to know the truth would come out…

    But I think I’m going to go back to watching delayed commercial free episodes on Amazon instead of Sling. I haven’t watched any cable or network TV programs broadcast with commercials since 2011 and watching the constant interruptions via Sling is driving me nuts.

    Posted by Lhamo55 | January 9, 2018, 9:55 pm
  5. Can someone please save the poor dogs. I mean really! These dogs did not ask for this kind of life and it makes me sick. They are definitely neglected and not being taken care of!

    Posted by Jill | January 10, 2018, 10:03 am
    • Oh my gosh!!! THANK YOU FOR SAYING THIS!! I’m going crazyyyy watching these poor dogs sit in the middle of these drugs, fights, speeding off in cats, different places to sleep! THIS IS ANIMAL CRUELTY!!! I hope to GOD A&E have rescued these poor terrified dogs!!! They don’t have a voice and should be SAVED!!!

      Posted by Sandra Jones | January 16, 2018, 9:24 pm
      • I meant speeding off in their cars!! PLEASE RESCUE THESE DOGS…. it’s breaking my heart!

        Posted by Sandra Jones | January 16, 2018, 9:26 pm
        • THIS!!! I have been watching the show since the very first one. I have been on this page for years. This is my first comment because I just DO NOT UNDERSTAND why they won’t save the dogs?!!?!?!? It is 100% animal abuse!

          Posted by Jillian S | January 19, 2018, 2:45 pm
  6. To be honest, I noticed a ‘certain’ interventionist who happens to be my least favorite (despite his good track record in getting people to go to the ‘Hab / treatment)… Jeff. Idk if he feels he is not sticking to his original values by doing the show as the format has changed which I respect, but what makes more sense in my humble opinion is that he wanted the TV and fame the whole time anyway – and now less and less of it is there compared to the lifesaving effort needed for these beautiful souls to rescue others. Even Donna, she came out and is an asset to this community. I find it all shocking, but being born in St. Louis, MO this triangle is ALL TO FAMILIAR – and if they read this and need a new state for a new season, try Missouri and I’m writing this from a border state myself – but BTH isn’t killing our youth and families, it’s fentanyl… ironic that it’s come to this for us to understand we have such an epidemic, but I think people like Candy and Ken are trying to appeal to new viewers by making things sound so recently discovered problems in the suburbs and actually especially the city… us in the ‘burbs just fit a stereotype and have more money in general. I feel for the people of Atlanta, but if this is the shift Intervention is going with, I’ll not stop watching it and I commend their ability to find a new way to surprise addicts.. but I hope the day never comes where they cancel it all again due to loss of viewership or this new change in format. I really have to say I don’t mind it but I will always miss the old format. They need to adopt Kristina Wandzilak’s ideal of leaving out the element of surprise – as there’s TONS of addicts including myself before I got clean this last run who I guarantee would have gone to treatment knowingly and taken advantage of this gift. I also think mental health is being ignored a bit too much overall in the show, and being a Psychology major myself – I see some personality disorders, some traits that are indicative of mood disorders, etc that are simply not ‘cured,’ ever… and these people will need to be medicated and taken care of thereafter. So to have the family cut off all contact as it were before seems just a tad counter-intuitive as well, because many of these people are sick beyond addiction – and I wish the show came out with more cases of explaining that (ie. Christina, not that it’s totally ethical to exploit mental illness, I wish they showcased that aspect more realistically). Thanks for anyone who reads this 🙂
    Much love and stay clean guys, I won’t preach sobriety as much as I just hope and pray anyone struggling can give up any drug of choice or any drug that alters them to choose that drug of choice and there are many paths to the same destination. I hope to share my knowledge one day and I look up to the Interventionists, including Jeff despite my rant in the beginning of him, for making public such an underground issue that we NEED to change before we lose our whole generation to this drug I am PERSONALLY familiar with. Wish I could say otherwise, but at least I know even in the early to mid 20’s, recovery IS possible. Long-term recovery. And medicating mental illness is also not the same as using street drugs, so always remember: progress is better than perfection which is an impossible pursuit to truly define but what matters is that you act yourself and pull yourself out of this emotional black hole that is killing our best mates, lovers, and family at alarming rates. Thx Dizzy for creating this site 🙂 Good to see people REALLY care and that I am not alone as an empath, recovering opiate addict, and future psychologist > PA specializing in the Psych. field, and if I have the knack for it maybe I’ll follow Sylvia’s can-do attitude and become an interventionist – as I connect well to others. Sorry for such a long rant, but this is such an open ended question and I also had things I wanted to open up about to this forum that I never did before. Just like when I first began hitting meetings, versus the confidence to share until I can’t anymore has become. Once again, GJ Dizzy and hope you at least get to read this little novel of a review and overall ideal. 🙂 -W

    Posted by Will | January 10, 2018, 4:43 pm
    • Will, I live in Arkansas but I’m less than an hour from the MO border. I have to agree with you that Heroin isn’t our biggest problem… it’s Fentanyl. Our kids have money. Our community has money. And they buy pills, and by the time they hit high school, the pills aren’t doing it anymore. So they buy Heroin. Except that it’s being cut here and there with Fentanyl. We are burying our children. It deeply saddens me.

      Posted by Jayne | January 11, 2018, 1:01 pm
    • In the episode “Chapter 5”, Sylvia would have been perfect with the guy who stormed off. They need to bring her back because I doubt this will be the first time someone bolts, and she knows exactly what to say and do to get a “fleeing” addict to return and accept treatment (like in the Karissa episode). Plus she is so warm and compassionate, and empathizes perfectly, and that’s what some people need to accept treatment. Nothing against Ken, I think he’s awesome too, but I’m sure during this season there will be more angry and panicked addicts running off, and Sylvia IMO is the absolute best at getting them to return.

      Posted by Jeff | January 29, 2018, 1:28 pm
    • Wow!? That was all over the place…

      Posted by Elaine | February 28, 2018, 9:29 pm
  7. Will, there are 2 major schools regarding interventions.

    In the Johnson model (the model used in every episode of the series), the element of surprise is the most crucial aspect. The idea is to leave the addict with no clue that they’re about to be intervened upon, so that they’re less likely to either pick up and run away to avoid the intervention, or go off on a binge and OD because they think it’ll be their last chance to get high.

    In the Invitational model (the one used by Kristina Wanzilak in her show), the addict is informed ahead of time and “invited” to participate in the intervention. The idea behind the Invitational model is that the addicts will be more likely to cooperate if they’re being told ahead of time what’s happening and given the opportunity to actively participate in the process.

    There has been no research I’m aware of that shows one model is more effective than the other.

    You’re 100% right about the mental health aspect – many of the addicts profiled in the series have underlying mental illnesses or personality disorders that showed up before the drug abuse began, and these problems make the addiction difficult if not impossible to fix. Gamblin’ Gabe, Cristy, Linda, Ryan (Fresno), Nick (Albuquerque) and Kaila are good examples. In these cases, if the addict is mentally ill then the mental illness needs to be brought under control before the addiction can be dealt with, and if the addict has a narcissistic or anti-social personality disorder then it’ll take a shitload of behavior modification therapy before the addiction can be fixed, if at all. I think the reason why the series doesn’t really go into detail on mental illness is because the science behind it is beyond the understanding of most people who watch the show, and if they go into it most viewers will lose interest and tune out.

    Posted by Galusha | January 11, 2018, 2:20 pm
  8. I really like the way the new series is being done. I am so curious to know what has happened with Billy and Tiffany? I sit and cried tonight as I watched them leave to go get help then Billy jumps out of the car. This couple reminds me so much of myself and my ex. We were just like them. I am a recovering addict. I actually used to drive from NC to a walk in pain clinic in Tucker Georgia to get Oxycodone. So I know all to well what they are daying about this triangle. My ex ended up robbing a pharmacy in NC he was so sick going through with drawals. Thankfully myself and him are both in recovery now. We are no longer together. I will always care about him but like Tiffany and Billy we thrived on each other. It was to much for us to be together. I pray they both get the help they need. It is no easy road and it is a battle I fight everyday. Thankfully I have a Savour that never gave up on me and protected me through this awful battle.

    Posted by Shelley | January 16, 2018, 7:19 pm
    • Tiffany and Billy are no longer together. Billy is living in CA and is sober. He is finally getting his life back and is working for a golf course doing what he did with his dad prior to the drugs. As for Tiffany idk.

      Posted by Hannah | January 27, 2018, 6:42 pm
      • Tiffany looks great, by looking at her pix! Her profile says she is living in California. Their boy is so handsome. Tracey looks good as well and still in California.

        Posted by Jillian | February 1, 2018, 9:51 pm
      • Tiff is doing great in California, working 2 jobs and also doing her best to get better working towards moving back home, eventually to help raise her little boy who resides with the grandma!
        Yay Tiff!!!

        Posted by Jenn | March 4, 2018, 2:08 pm
      • Hannah,I agree The Story of Tiffany and Billy was so compelling And raw and real!!! It just really makes you root for them. I know that we Wished the best for each & everyone of them But there is something about them as a couple & parents And watching them in the heart wrenching Throws of addiction that just drew you in. I also felt that way about Allen. You could see the good heart in him & how intelligent he is Even though the The drug abuse had probably done extraordinary damage to him you could still see that he has so much potential. My final Heartbreak of watching this was of course Taylor And I just feel like there was so much that was probably cut out whether it was due to respective editing or other circumstances. My sincerest and loving condolences go out to her family and friends. May she rest in peace. I have such a love for this show and always will no matter what format they arrange it in. I don’t think I’ve ever Been so captivated By the show and the series of episodes nor have I ever shed so many tears while watching I will always be a loyal viewer And have so much respect for the crew and the interventionists,LE,the kind compassionate judge,the City& it’s officials,The Zone As well as the participants. Thank you all for your courage and love. It takes such brevity & rallying together to make it so successful!!! Thank you! Thank you!XO Jen

        Posted by Jen | March 10, 2018, 4:18 pm
  9. I really hope Tiffany can get clean and stay clean, you can see how much she loves and cares for her child. Tiffany stay strong! We are rooting for you!

    Posted by lauren | January 17, 2018, 3:17 pm
  10. How is Zac doing, very concerned about him!!! I feel there is too little of him on the show!!!

    Posted by Beau G Gavaldon | January 18, 2018, 4:40 pm
  11. Tiffany,Tracey,and Billy are all doing well.

    Posted by Viewer | January 20, 2018, 1:41 pm
  12. I hope she does also. She wants to be with that baby all the time. There is some mothers that just keep having babies get them taken and they could careless. I feel like she is not one of those mother’s. She genuinely wants to be a good mommy and loves her baby.

    Posted by Shellwy | January 20, 2018, 5:45 pm
  13. Does anyone know if an update show will be done on thos series? I’d really like to know how they all are doing.

    Posted by Shelley | January 20, 2018, 5:47 pm
  14. I’m really worried about Toni’s ex (Michah) who seems really solid in his recovery – but she keeps calling him! I don’t blame him for trying to get her off the phone – but I worry that he’s going to go find her and fall back into his old way of life with her.

    Posted by Lily | January 23, 2018, 5:00 am
  15. Taylor episode has not been shown yet.. Sadly to say Taylor has passed… Such a beautiful soul

    Posted by Jennifer | January 23, 2018, 12:35 pm
  16. I hope Tiffany, Billy and Tracey keep going. I have faith in them.

    Posted by Racquel | January 24, 2018, 3:49 pm
  17. Will there be a follow up episode , I would like to know how teveryone is doing , and what about Allen?

    Posted by Stephanie | January 30, 2018, 5:00 pm
  18. Please please keep this going ! Love it so much better than the old shows it’s kinda like a movie it’s longer and to me you see everything vs a lil slide show like the other intervention shows ! Please keep going it’s helping I’m sure of it but letting the viewers get all the details of the show and just a continue of it and from the beginning to the end instead of a few days is just awesome !

    Posted by Amber Dun | January 31, 2018, 8:31 am
  19. Okay so I know for a fact there will be another season. However I think they’re going to go back to the old format. Sylvia posted on FB saying she’ll be intervening on a subject named Jackie next season.

    Posted by Andy | February 2, 2018, 8:12 pm
  20. I finally watched 3 episodes of this season, and I just don’t like it. It feels less focused, although I applaud them for trying something new.

    Posted by Stefan | February 2, 2018, 11:29 pm
  21. As previously mentioned, last night’s episode featured Taylor, the gorgeous red headed girl. Sadly she passed away. Condolences to her family and friends:(

    https://www.gofundme.com/86tyj-help-taylors-family

    Posted by Mike | February 7, 2018, 8:51 am
  22. I’ve been an avid viewer for years but this season of “The Heroin Triangle” really bothers me because I feel it’s entirely inaccurate. For each and every addict they feature, they blame prescriptions as the gateway that started them on heroin. Yes, this is the case for SOME people, but more often than not, it’s completely untrue. As such, I think “Intervention” is doing the public a grave disservice. Shows like this, along with politicians and the media, keep feeding us this garbage that prescription pills are creating heroin addicts and killing people. Not true at all. It’s fentanyl and its derivatives alone that are causing the sudden increase in overdoses and deaths and yet it seems no one is willing to report that or tell that story. If prescriptions were the sole cause of heroin addiction, logic would dictate that we’d never have had a heroin problem at all prior to people being prescribed pain meds. Heroin has been around for a very long time, well over a century even, yet now we’re suddenly saying that people are only addicted to heroin because they broke an arm, got some Vicodin, and a week later were pushing a needle in their arm. That’s ridiculous. I know many, many people who are on pain meds or have taken pain meds for an extended time for an injury, and not once did they go seeking more pills, nor did they ever progress to heroin. As long as we continue to blame prescriptions and doctors for the so called “opioid epidemic,” we will never truly get to the bottom of the issue, which is FENTANYL. And unfortunately, “Intervention” is perpetuating this falsehood.

    Posted by Krusty Kat | February 10, 2018, 10:42 am
    • I completely agree with everything you said. Two main aspects they’re completely ignoring is the role mental illnesses and trauma play in addiction. I think trauma is a far bigger indicator of someone’s likeliness to abuse pain meds than prescriptions alone. The more I meet people who are addicts and hear their story and watch shows like Intervention, the more my theory is reaffirmed. Trauma and addiction go hand in hand, and not just drug addiction, food addiction as well. If you watch My 600 lb Life on TLC, nearly all of the food addicts appearing on the show have had some sort of traumatic event in their life. Trauma seems to be a precursor to addiction way more than a simple pain med prescription. That being said, the question we should be asking ourselves should be “how can we prevent trauma?” on an individual and societal level.

      Posted by Nicole | March 7, 2018, 7:45 am
    • No one has ever blamed pills for the cause of heroin addiction…. First off before I pour my heart out to explain my thoughts….. Are you an addict or are you basing your opinions through others you may be close to?

      Posted by Dustin Hammond | March 10, 2018, 10:19 am
      • Uuuhhhhh, yes I knew people who were all about the oxycontin would say they would never ever do heroin. But guess what, when them oxys went away, guess what they were ALL smoking and shooting? The same thing they were addicted too, another opiate called herion.

        Posted by Colleen Jones | March 20, 2018, 7:14 pm
  23. I suppose I should’ve read a little more of your commentary before writing my post, because unfortunately it seems you’ve also bought into the whole pills-lead-to-heroin crap. I mean, really. Please explain to me the relevance or connection to pain meds and hand sanitizer, for example. In almost every synapses, you make sure to mention prescriptions, whether they have anything to do with the person’s current addiction or not, as if to suggest that some medication taken years and years ago somehow led to an insatiable desire for hand sanitizer. In another description, the person was clearly an alcoholic, yet you chose to highlight their occasional use of benzos. As a result, we have perfectly good hearted and well meaning doctors terrified of prescribing medications when they are clearly warranted. We have the authorities filing lawsuits against drug companies rather than focusing on the mass quantities of fentanyl flowing in from China. Stop believing the propaganda that the government is feeding you. Everyone wants someone to point a finger at and they’re wrongly going after doctors, pharmacies, and even Big Pharma. I guess they’ll be sorely surprised when the overdoses and deaths continue despite the new restrictions on pain meds.

    Posted by Krusty Kat | February 10, 2018, 11:50 am
    • Those synopses you’re referring to were not written by me, they are the episode summaries that A&E put out. I’m not pushing any narrative.

      I haven’t bought into any propaganda, but I have done a fair amount of basic research on the topic and while I do agree with you that blaming prescription drugs for the entire epidemic is harmful, especially to those who need pain meds and now aren’t able to get it, I can’t agree that there is zero correlation between prescription painkillers and opioid addiction & overdoses. That’s just not true. Painkillers may not be the sole culprit and the government putting so much focus on limiting prescriptions may not be the best way to curb the epidemic, but I don’t believe they’re as blameless as you do. And just as you know many people who took painkillers without getting addicted or progressing, I know of many who did.

      I haven’t heard about Fentanyl coming in from China, do you have a link to an article or something so that I can understand?

      Posted by Dizzy | February 10, 2018, 12:57 pm
      • Hey dizzy, I was wondering what do you think of this season? I don’t think I’ve seen you comment at all. Do you like this format better or do you like the old one better?

        Posted by Andy | February 13, 2018, 4:07 pm
        • I think it’s interesting for a season or two to highlight particularly affected communities but I wouldn’t want the show to change its format to this indefinitely.

          Overall I like what they’re doing this season but I do have some nagging issues with it. It’s troubling to me that because this epidemic has now reached white middle & upper class suburban people it needs to be dealt with in a more sympathetic, understanding way. I think that’s good, that’s how it should be dealt with, but I feel like they have repeatedly implied this season that they’re in this community because the opioid problem is now affecting *important* people, not just the usual expected (poor, non-white) addicts. It’s fascinating to see Officer Josh treat the addicts he encounters with such kindness and offers of help, even to the point of not arresting them in hopes that they’ll go to treatment, while you just know that a half hour away black men and women are being caught doing the same thing but are arrested and put in jail. I’m absolutely supportive of the treatment instead of punishment approach to dealing with addiction at the policing level, and I think Josh seems like a genuinely good person who wants to help people. I do have to wonder though, if these families were predominantly poor and/or black, would Intervention even be there? Would the cop be so gentle? There just seems to be the underlying theme this season that suburban white people are unfortunate victims of an epidemic while more “inner-city” addicts are simply criminals.

          So that’s what I think, since you asked. 🙂

          Posted by Dizzy | February 14, 2018, 9:46 am
        • You have got to be joking, right? Nobody said these people are more important because they are white. You are looking for things to get offended about that simply aren’t there. We are all people Dizzy. I don’t care what your skin color is. That is really sad that you live your life playing the “would they care if these people were black” , or “would the cops be so gentle if these people were black” game. Come on! I’m amazed that you are so eagerly looking to claim victimization here, when there was nothing remotely racist happening on this show. If that is immediately where your thoughts wander to, then that is just awful. I will be praying for u.

          Posted by JoJo | February 28, 2018, 9:54 pm
        • For not caring about what anyone’s skin color is, you sure are defensive about skin color. Maybe instead of praying for me you should pray for the people who go on the internet to berate strangers for asking questions about possible underlying racial bias on a reality TV show. That’s far more troubling behavior than anything you’re accusing me of.

          Posted by Dizzy | March 1, 2018, 6:40 am
        • No one can dispute that this season chose to focus on only one tiny white, middle-class segment of the addiction epidemic, but it’s called targeting one’s audience. What race and socioeconomic level are most “Intervention” viewers? What race and socioeconomic level are most A&E viewers? You have to put aside your personal feelings and understand that the show is a business and their primary concerns are ratings and revenue. The show has to play to its audience. If it aired on BET you’d see the crew going into inner city black neighbourhoods and focusing on the drug epidemic there, and not one addict would be white. If it aired on TLC or Spike TV you’d see the crew going into rural white areas and small cities such as Huntington WV, and not one addict would be a minority.
          As successful as the show has been on A&E, I’m surprised that networks with largely minority audiences such as BET or Univision haven’t put out similar shows. That would ensure that addiction among non-white people is adequately exposed and covered by the media.

          Posted by Janelle | March 1, 2018, 8:49 am
        • I just finished watching the seasons do loved it. It might have been better because I binge watched the last 5 episodes. Fantastic! I liked getting to know everyone.

          Posted by areuuukind | March 1, 2018, 11:49 pm
    • Agree totally with your comment!!! It’s people not a medication.

      Posted by Amanda | February 28, 2018, 6:53 pm
  24. Will there be a follow up of any of these episodes this season?

    Posted by Brooke | February 14, 2018, 4:23 am
  25. Tiffany appears to be quite pregnant in her update shots from rehab. They attempt to just film her from the chest up but it’s still obvious.

    Posted by LadyT | February 21, 2018, 2:48 pm
  26. Allen’s brother is so handsome. What a shame Allen ruined his face and his health with drugs.

    Posted by April | February 22, 2018, 7:24 pm
  27. I’m about 15 minutes into the first episode and already do not like this season, especially in the wake of watching “Heroin(e)” on Netflix (which is up for an Academy Award). That documentary focuses on Huntington, West Virginia, the community with the highest number of overdose deaths in the country, and guess what– it ain’t in the suburbs. You cannot talk about an ‘epidemic’ in the context of public health without talking about the environmental factors that caused it to reach its tipping point, and the communities that are struggling the most are the rural and urban ones that have been plagued with displacement, joblessness, and generational poverty. I do not believe that heroin is “new” to rich areas; they simply haven’t been as exposed to surveillance and over-policing. The spate of overdoses in the “heroin triangle” reflect a growing trend that has already impacted disaffected areas, in that heroin has become more powerful as the demand for stronger opiates has increased. They’re just the last section of America to experience it. All of this to say that I think the new season’s focus is irresponsible, not only for cherry-picking an area that they feel would curate higher levels of sympathy from audiences (since we don’t “expect” rich kids to die from ODs), but for not deconstructing any greater social and economic explanations for the so-called epidemic. As the interventionist are trying to save the beautiful, affluent white Atlanta suburbs from themselves, my own organization is fighting tooth and nail simply to be able pass out narcan in racially segregated public housing….not because we don’t have enough narcan available, but because the residents are worries about being associated with anything that might draw attention from the cops who are constantly hovering over them and don’t give a shit whether they live or die. People OD all the time in those neighborhoods, and the names never make the news.

    Posted by Laura | February 22, 2018, 9:56 pm
    • I think you’re spot on Laura. Thanks for the insightful comment and thank you for the work you’re doing.

      Posted by Dizzy | February 23, 2018, 8:11 am
      • Likewise, Dizzy! I appreciate your earlier commentary on this as well.

        Posted by Laura | February 26, 2018, 10:58 pm
      • I agree with Dizzy! This is a very insightful and well written comment. I think it is disheartening to see the same types of people portrayed on intervention over and over this season. We rarely see minorities. Also, the poor would really need treatment because likely they don’t have good insurance or money to afford it, whereas many of the middle class white people like the ones we see this season are more likely to have access to quality treatment.

        Posted by Nicole | March 7, 2018, 8:18 am
    • I so agree!!! Best thing I’ve read in awhile.

      Posted by Amanda | February 28, 2018, 6:54 pm
    • If Narcan isn’t accepted by the addicts you claim are too afraid to take it, what makes you think they’ll accept having an interevention in their family living room with a whole lot of people, cameras, crews before allowing them to be followed beforehand for days?

      Posted by kitty katt | March 5, 2018, 7:04 pm
      • you clearly did not read my post. numero uno, the narcan we distribute is not only for “addicts”, but often winds up in the hands of friends and family members around them who want to be able to administer it if their loved one– pardon me, “the addict”– overdoses. numero dos, the reason the specific community i mentioned is afraid to take it is not because they do not want narcan supplied, but because they are fearful that possession of it will be an excuse for harassment or being subjected to search/seizure by the corrupt and racist police force in our town. lastly, your question is irrelevant and really makes no sense because my organizations does not do interventions, and i cannot for the life of me understand what makes you think these two variables are connected.

        Posted by Laura | March 6, 2018, 1:17 am
        • And you clearly didn’t understand mine or my point.

          Have a nice day.

          Posted by kitty katt | March 6, 2018, 5:57 am
      • nope, i sure didn’t. did you have one?…more specifically, an informed one?

        Posted by Laura | March 8, 2018, 12:36 am
        • Too bad. No need in wasting anyone’s time here. I won’t bother wasting mine.

          Posted by kitty katt | March 8, 2018, 7:26 am
  28. Taylor’s obituary:

    http://www.scotthuskins.com/tnb

    RIP

    Posted by Kristina | February 28, 2018, 5:13 pm
  29. I tuned into this season rather late. I am intrigued by Alan. I saw something about him writing music or something having to do with music. Does anyone have any back story, history or info about him?

    Posted by FERN | March 1, 2018, 1:46 pm
  30. I realized this season wasn’t filmed in the same manner that all previous season’s have and do know this more so of a “Special” but I felt like it was just all over the place with these episodes. You really didn’t get much of their “before lives” and certainly not much of “after rehab”. I think it would have been better (for me anyway) is to film it as all previous episodes are….have a story line for one or even two people per show and start from the beginning until the end and focus on them only. It could have still been called “The Heroin Triangle” but instead of having almost like a soap opera type of storyline (to be continued…etc., etc.) stick to those same individuals for the entire show and then move on to the next ones.

    Posted by kitty katt | March 1, 2018, 4:54 pm
  31. I enjoyed the new format! I binge watched this season over the course of a couple days. I wish the season was longer with more people. Rest In Peace Taylor. 😢

    Posted by Hector | March 1, 2018, 8:49 pm
  32. It sickens me to realize Taylor has passed. I was really rooting for her and she was so beautiful.

    Posted by Tracy Shorten | March 2, 2018, 7:25 pm
  33. I finally had a chance to catch up on a few episodes. I wish all of them well. I was/am really praying for Toni. She is precious. Stay up, girl you have a beautiful smile.
    So sad to see that Taylor passed. RIP

    Posted by Karra | March 5, 2018, 8:37 pm
  34. Wow!!! I along with many others so saddened Taylor passed. Her family, friends, I know how you feel. My brother tragically passed away in 2010. My prayers and thoughts for you Taylor.

    Posted by tommy the cat | March 7, 2018, 3:32 am
  35. The whole death of Taylor doesn’t make sense to me. Her mom caused her to use, yet she moved back with her mom to the same place?? Not smart and she’s an adult. So she didn’t need to love with her mom. She could have found a good job and supported her sober living. Her best friend posts it was an asthma attack and later posts about drugs. Soooooo what’s the story? Taylor had a lot going for her. She got her teeth fixed and was on the right path. As stated before what’s up with the boyfriend? Obviously he was a user. This story is so said and unfinished. RIP Taylor you deserved so much more

    Posted by Natalie | March 8, 2018, 11:13 am
  36. Props to people who are sober and have stayed sober. I have 5 years, 2 boys and it’s one of the hardest things I EVER did and continue to do. I don’t think that having this different format makes it any less of a show. Thanks to you interventionists and all that you do to make our world a better place. Your greatness and kindness is what people are lacking everywhere. If 1 person could stay sober that’s a life you’ve saved and changed. That’s amazing, coming from a teacher, I understand this!

    Posted by Colleen Jones | March 20, 2018, 7:00 pm
  37. What happened with Zac?

    Posted by Damien | March 31, 2018, 2:37 am
  38. Does anyone know when this season was filmed?

    Posted by Jennie | April 8, 2018, 3:52 pm
  39. Does anyone have any updates on the addicts who were portrayed in this season?

    I know Taylor unfortunately didn’t survive her addiction (such a pretty girl).

    The one addict who really stood out for me here was Allen. You couldn’t help but love the guy even though you hated what he was doing to himself and his family. High or not, he took Toni under his wing (per say) as if she was his own daughter. They had a special bond and I could honestly say that I do believe the loved and respected one another. Not just in the way some addicts “love” but in your heart kind of love.

    Any updates on him or anyone else would be great. Thanks!

    Posted by kitty katt | April 23, 2018, 5:29 pm
  40. I like this format and it really does remind me of the Heroin(e) doc, but I thought it was strange in terms of location. I lived in Atlanta for 2 years around the “triangle” during this period and there was never any talk of epidemic-level opiate/heroin abuse. I worked in the non-profit sector where I definitely would have heard about this. Look at this CDC map here: https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths.html. If anything, opiate use would by sky-rocketing in more rural parts of Georgia (e.g. Columbus). It is interesting though that there are tons of incentives to film in Georgia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_industry_in_Georgia). To be honest, I think Intervention producers just made the “triangle” up as an excuse to film in that location. That all being said, these people needed help and I’m glad some of them found it. I know opiate abuse is wide-spread and every community has been affected, but some much more than others.

    Posted by Lee | May 1, 2018, 6:08 am
  41. Those who say there’s no correlation between prescription opiates…

    I’m sorry, but you’re dead wrong.

    I’ve been an EMT in NY and NJ for 23 years and a nurse for 11. While nursing (cardiac) is my paid gig, I still do EMS one night a week in a very diverse but economically disadvantaged city in the Hudson Valley in NY. Also did that and cardiac surgical ICU at the Jersey shore in a wealthy community for 5 years. Guess what? Both areas have a HUGE opiate addiction problem and a good 75% of the time, the addict began with Rx opiates. This past Saturday night during my 7am to 7pm ambulance shift, I pushed a total of 12…yes TWELVE mg of Narcan. (Not all to one patient) And this isn’t uncommon. One patient was a 62 year old grandfather of three. One patient didn’t survive.

    People assume if you do this work as long as I have, it gets easier. Newsflash…

    It doesn’t.

    Now, do all patients prescribed opiates become addicts? Of course not, not by far, and some patients do deserve the medication! But please believe me, someone working in emergency/critical care medicine over 20 years….

    The majority of heroin addict pts begin with prescription opiates.

    Posted by Nurse Sugar | June 5, 2018, 6:16 pm
    • ur right!! guess what.. i work in pediatrics in a very wealthy part of NJ and guess what, we keep narcan in the office- why?.. We’ve had 4 overdoses, 3 fatal- started with rx opioids then went to the devils dandruff

      Posted by jacinda | June 6, 2018, 9:50 am
  42. I feel like this is a season that, given time and the long term ability to work in a single area, could be a great breath of fresh air to the show. Interacting with the community, law, rehab centers, etc… is where so much of the real world takes place. If anything disappoints me about the show it is that too often the acceptance to go to rehab is seen as the goal- but how many do we see leave? Too long a story for now, but I left a rehab once, and I’m a little down on rehab facilities- there are too many- I know real hard work takes place in and after the rehabs- I’d love to see more in depth coverage of someone through the whole process. The show sometimes was a little shaky in the story department and sometimes the threads became too complicated- but I’d love to see them try it again!

    Posted by Dan | July 15, 2018, 7:39 pm
  43. A little late to the conversation, just watched the first couple of episodes with Billy and Tiffany last night . I was shocked and saddened to recognize scenes from a local park a mile from where I live in Marietta. I’ve been going there for years and had no idea this was going on so close to home. I hope they were able to get the help so desperately needed.

    Posted by Laura | July 30, 2018, 10:36 am
  44. I just watched this, so I’m going to comment. I did comment, but it didn’t post, so Dizzy can remove this if I am commenting twice. I didn’t originally watch this, as I heard suburban and affluent and thought, I have nothing in common with these people- but that wasn’t true at All. I could completely relate to toni and Taylor and they became two of my favorite people ever featured on the show, ever. I cried when I found out Taylor passed, and God bless her family and friends, if they are reading this- she seemed so lovely. What I learned from watching this is the addiction there isn’t really different from the addiction where I come from- so many people on the show were multi generational addicts. If we believe (and I do) that addiction is a gene, then they’re no different than I am. Plus, they grew up in the same chaos and struggle I did- only poverty was missing. But growing up with an addict is hard either way. I really liked this season. It humanize the struggle. It’s hard to not think, oh everyone is being nice now that addiction is affecting white, affluent people- but it’s not their fault that all those other people were treated like crap throughout history. We are finally righting the wrongs- and hopefully it will reach out and serve addicts in ALL jurisdictions.

    Posted by Tobie | August 26, 2018, 7:44 am
    • Drug Addiction (or any other addiction, for that matter) is not prejudice. It comes in all sizes, shapes, and colors. It’s a world wide problem and not just one place. It lives in many different homes….whether it’s a card board box or mansion, it doesn’t care.

      Posted by Kitty Katt | August 26, 2018, 9:55 pm

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