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New Season of Intervention January 2nd

Good news! Intervention comes back on January 2nd, as per this FB post.  I know there was a lot of talk about the previous season possibly being its last, but it’ll be around for at least another 8 episodes. It looks like this season will be a departure from the show’s basic formula, instead exploring the effects of the current opioid epidemic specifically. Not sure if that means there won’t be the standard end-of-episode interventions or what, and I’m curious about how the “interconnected stories of addicts” will play out. Maybe the whole season takes place in 1 location and the addicts are all part of the same community? That could be really interesting.

We were just talking about how Intervention needed to shake things up a little bit because the formula was getting tired, and a few commenters even mentioned the opioid crisis as a reason to keep the show going. Are the producers are reading Intervention Directory or what?

 

 

Categories: Updates

Discussion

13 Responses to “New Season of Intervention January 2nd”

  1. I hope they continue with the Legacy updates!

    Posted by Stefan | November 28, 2017, 11:34 pm
  2. Hey looks like I was right, the new season will focus on one community.

    From the website:
    A&E Network will premiere a special new season of the Emmy® Award-winning and critically-acclaimed docuseries Intervention. For the first time in series history, this season will follow interconnected stories of addicts and their families suffering at the hands of the national opioid crisis. Living in a cluster of communities within the affluent Atlanta suburbs known as “The Heroin Triangle,” the families chronicled highlight the desperate need for support and help during this national drug emergency. Intervention profiles people whose uncontrollable addiction to drugs, alcohol or compulsive behavior has brought them to the brink of destruction and has devastated their family and friends. This season focuses on the journey of those plagued by their opioid addictions and their families who are left to pick up the pieces, as well as the city officials who are on the ground fighting as they attempt to intervene and save the lives of those affected as well as help heal the community. Veteran interventionists Candy Finnigan, Ken Seeley, and Donna Chavous partner with interventionist and Georgia native, Heather Hayes, as well as new team member, Michael Gonzales as they face the biggest challenge of their careers and attempt to help these victims of addiction.

    Posted by Dizzy | November 30, 2017, 2:53 pm
  3. I sort of like this – I like that there will be multiple episodes focused on interconnected individuals (assuming it’s multigenerational). But I really don’t love the “opioid epidemic” language. In my lifetime there’s been a “crack epidemic” and a “meth epidemic” and now an “opioid epidemic.” There are differences – particularly with fentanyl being introduced into the market now and the potential for overdose being so high. But what bothers me is that one of the main differences between this current opioid “epidemic” and the meth and crack “epidemics” is one of demographics. Opioid addiction and overdose are finally hitting across all racial groups (including caucasians) and economic classes – including wealthy families. I think that is part of what is driving this sense of emergency.

    Don’t get me wrong – I understand that addiction hits all races and socioeconomic classes – always has and always will. But I also believe that if there weren’t larger numbers of middle- and upper-class whites becoming addicted to and in some cases, overdosing on opioids, we wouldn’t be calling this an “epidemic” and/or declaring this a “national emergency.” So from that perspective, I’m not sure I’m fully in favor of this approach. I’ll be curious to see how Intervention handles this.

    Posted by Elizabeth M. | November 30, 2017, 4:11 pm
    • thank you for voicing this. i feel the same way; people of color have also been extremely disaffected by heroin use at different times during the last 50 years, and of course during the so-called “crack epidemic”, but the response was to implement draconian laws and expand mass incarceration, rather than treat it as a public health emergency. and we don’t see the same sympathy or concern extended to those directly impacted by the “meth epidemic” (although if statistics are telling, it is on the rise again as prescription opiates and heroin use are beginning to stabilize, at least in appalachia where i live); nor does there seem to be particular concern devoted to the people who have less access to treatment, and have to rely on needle exchanges and free naloxone distributors (when available) to help manage their use for lack of better options. these failures absolutely reflect a disparity in race and class outcomes, and if we’re going to use words like “epidemic”, it should be a term re-framed with those issues in mind. i’m not optimistic that this new season is going to critically examine those factors, but it is refreshing to hear that other viewers are thinking along those lines.

      Posted by Laura | November 30, 2017, 9:30 pm
  4. I should also mention that I’m really pleased Intervention is coming back at all. A&E has done a lousy job of promoting the show and I was pretty sure they were just burning off whatever they had and then were going to cancel altogether. So it’s great that they have continued to do this work and are coming back in the new year!

    Posted by Elizabeth M. | November 30, 2017, 4:12 pm
  5. This will be interesting to watch being that I live in said Heroin triangle. I’ve never noticed anything like this so I hope to learn something new.

    Posted by Flamingo | December 1, 2017, 7:39 pm
  6. Instead of focusing on the “opioid epidemic”, how about you shine a spotlight on how this supposed “epidemic” is affecting chronic pain patients. We are being denied access to treatment options that allow us to work, fulfill our parental roles, and actually live rather than exist. People living with legitimate pain are taking their own lives because no other options are left. We are forced into sudden and potentially life threatening withdrawals from opiates after taking our meds as perscribed for years. Where are out stories? Where is our outrage?

    Posted by Shay | December 16, 2017, 9:12 pm
    • Exactly my thinking. I’ve written to my state representatives asking what I’m supposed to do. I’ve asked if they’d prefer I stop working and go out on disability instead of working full time and contributing to my community and society. I get form letters back. I just went through a three day battle with my insurance to get my meds covered. If not for a compassionate pharmacist I would have ended up in the hospital due to withdrawals.

      Posted by Dee | March 3, 2018, 1:49 pm
  7. Looking forward to this. Though opiates were not my drug of choice it seems like most people i knew did opiates or had a family member who did. This was in the new bedford mass area. Moved out of there a year ago.

    Posted by Anna | January 2, 2018, 7:56 am
  8. So did I miss something or was last night just a repeat of the first two episodes? When is A&E airing a new one?

    Posted by Elizabeth M. | January 9, 2018, 4:58 pm
  9. Can someone please tell me the updates on the Herion triangle chapter 5 my tv turned off 10 minutes to early and I’ve been waiting and praying for these wonderful people PLEASE someone catch me up god bless and thank you

    Posted by Danie | January 23, 2018, 11:33 pm
  10. Will we get updated on Tiffany and Billing and the rest that went to get help. Want to know how they are doing.

    Posted by Kim | January 25, 2018, 6:32 am
  11. Saw last night a commercial for the new season starting June 5th. Looks like they are going back to the original format. Cant wait!

    Posted by melissa | April 27, 2018, 6:09 am

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